THC Delta 8 in dogs:

An update on THC Delta 8 Isomer in Dogs 

Despite the Internet’s insistence that Delta-8 Isomer THC in dogs is “toxic” –  it’s entirely the opposite. 

THC Delta 8 in dogs works VERY well with a long re-dosing interval. 

Once-a-day dosing is VERY reasonable. If you dose Delta-8 Isomer gummies in the morning , it will wear off completely at about 18-22 hours. 

Dosing THC Delta 8 in dogs more conservatively can ensure that effects don’t last more than 24 hours. And can sustain a suitable length-of-effect without dosing as high as the first dose. 

After the first few doses of THC Delta 8 in dogs, drooling is MINIMAL. 

There is definitely a “first 3-5 hours” of visible effect from the Delta 8 Gummies. Where the dog might sway while standing, or bump into your leg when turning around. After that time, however, you can still see a ‘calmness’ without any physical manifestation. Just a “slower wagging tail” and a more “considered” response to squirrels in the yard or the UPS man crossing the driveway. 


I doubt that a dog would need to be on Delta 8 THC Isomer gummies for life. My wager would be that a dog would realize that “so much angst” is unnecessary and unwarranted and “forget” to be so spazzy about things. That would be the hope, anyway. 


There’s a chart for dosing, and a VERY comprehensive discussion of the obvious and not-so-obvious side effects of THC Delta 8 isomer gummies in dogs. The assessments were done with healthy subject dogs, using 25mg Gummies by “Koi Inc.” Grape flavored without xylitol. 

THC Delta 8 in dogs:  https://drjohnson.com/thc 

Disclaimer: It’s crucial that these comments and notes aren’t broadened to include Delta 6,9,10 nor “full spectrum” THC or “plain weed” because it’s NOT. These notes and assessments are made on a specific strength, brand and dose of Delta 8 isomer THC given as an oral ‘gummy’. It has never been recommended for use over 1mg/kg and it’s unlikely it would ever need to be. 

 

BONE BROTH and BEEF BONES Notes that’ll surprise you I think.

Marrow Bones and Bone Broth 

A note for dog owners. 

I want NOT to bombard with information about dogs and cats but sometimes I see something “enough times” to think that “Hmmm I should say something about this because people won’t know.” 

It’s about bone broth. 

Bone broth is a soup or stock made with bones. Like, the marrow (which is a LOT of fat) is melted out of bones making a tasty marrow / bone broth. 

What’s good: 

It has lots of nutrients that are from the marrow. Even iron. 

What’s bad: 

It’s a LOT (I mean a LOT) of fat. So if you noticed that when you put it on your dog’s food they “Eat like never before” that’s why. And then you’ll notice their weight climbing up month after month. 

REMEMBER: 

Bone broth is basically “Liquid Pizza” for a dog’s waistline. 

It gets worse: 

Bone broth and any other source of fat over 15% in toto are actually LIKELY to cause gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea and eventually, chronic colitis. 

If you and your Vet are battling your dog’s chronic diarrhea (like every month or more) it could be a cumulative effect of too much fat in the diet. Overweight dogs have a very high likelihood of diarrhea and GI Upset. 

CONCLUSION: 

I said all that to say this:   I’d leave Bone Broth out of a dog’s diet. If they don’t wanna eat dry dog food dry, twice a day, then I’d suspect they’re at a really good weight and don’t NEED the calories. 

Adding Bone Broth makes them eat WITHOUT NEED and they get fat. 

Two random notes:   

BONES GET STUCK SURPRISINGLY: 

We cut a bone off a dog’s lower jaw again the other day. It was a “marrow bone” which is basically a ‘bracelet’ made of bone, and full of marrow / fat. The bone gets ‘emptied out’ pretty fast, giving the dog a sudden 750 calorie punch in the waist. Then they slide the bone down over their lower jaw and have to go get it cut off. 

BEST BONE FOR DOGS:

Secret sauce: Beef Shanks. All of the marrowy goodness MUCH more slowly, and no bones over the lower jaw. ALWAYS make sure it’s a BEEF shank because a PORK SHANK will splinter like a Pinata full of razorblades. 

A WORD OF CAUTION: 

In fact, I STRENUOUSLY recommend AGAINST any and all bones which are PORK origin. Only BEEF bones have any chance against the jaws of a dog over 40 pounds. For the rest, Pork Bones Splinter. 

 In the picture, Robin plays with a big BEEF Knuckle

THC in Grams: That’s How “They” Discuss Delta 8 THC in Dogs

It’s obvious to an outside observer that CBD manufacturers have everything to lose with THC becoming more and more accessible. 

CBD doesn’t work without micro-traces of THC. 
Which is fine if you use CBD with less than 0.3% THC and give enough to hit some THC-mark that works. 
But I believe that THC in one form, or another (Delta-8) is here to stay and should be embraced. 
The following article shows that THC isomer Delta-8 being discussed in GRAMS is an effective way to demonize it, versus acknowledging that in MILLIgrams (a thousand times less) –  It’s safe. 

Let’s look at Delta 8 use in dogs. Specifically: DELTA 8 isomer of THC, by mouth, in dogs.

There are NO articles on the Internet that SPECIFICALLY address the use of THC-Isomer Delta 8 in dogs, canines. There ARE however hundreds of articles that have been mashed up, and TITLED to contain information about THC isomer Delta 8 –  however ALL of those articles are variations of practically a SINGLE article that appeared on a University website, which was written by biased authors providing disinformation thusly:

  • That THC Delta 8 Isomer is toxic in dogs.
  • That the symptoms of administering ANY dose of THC Delta 8 isomer are identical to dangerous, documented overdosage with THC in-general.
  • Reference ONLY articles that highlight the symptoms, doses and management of animals receiving the LD50 of full-spectrum tetra-hydro-cannabinol.

In other words, the articles are a DISINFORMATION effort to demonize Delta-8 THC Isomer use in dogs simply by attributing research on THC overdose as symptoms of any THC Delta 8 isomer dosing. Practically all instances of this information end up by suggesting the purchase of a “safer” CBD Product from the website. Delta 8 THC is dangerous? Nothing could be further from the truth.

In fact, the LD50 of THC Isomer Delta 8 in dogs is THIRTY TIMES the doses that you’d actually use for therapeutic effect in dogs.

Let’s look at Delta 8 use in dogs. Specifically: DELTA 8 isomer of THC, by mouth, in dogs. Not full THC. And not at overdose.

Beta Blocker Atenolol to Modify Heart Rate and Blood Pressure in Cats: Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Atenolol is a beta blocker commonly used by veterinarians to treat specific heart rhythm problems, hypertension, or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats. This class of drugs works to block the beta specific receptors which in turn can reduce symptoms such as artificially increased blood sugar, a too-fast heart rate, and increased blood pressure – similar to the effects of an ‘adrenalin rush’.

Interesting Summary Points:

  1. Using beta blockers in cats with HCM did not influence symptoms
  2. Using beta blockers in cats with HCM did not extend or shorten life
  3. Beta blockers did reduce blood pressure and reduce heart rate which are desirable in HCM cases
  4. Beta blockers are well tolerated by cats and their dosing is pretty consistent and well worked out.
  5. Metoprolol is, at this writing, discontinued.

Use of Gabapentin in Cats

It's interesting to look at articles on the use of Gabapentin in cats and see how “different” the author's takeaway is, from the actual results of the study. I think it has to do with how deeply a reader or veterinarian actually digs into the references.
Here's an example: An author makes assessments and assertions about the effectiveness of Gabapentin in cats and says that it helps. But neglects that every single study they referenced ALSO used other medications WITH the Gabapentin.
So, I tried to be careful in assessing this.
I mean, it looks good?
But just how good, I am doubtful honestly.
No harm I am sure. The drug is super safe.
But I think for the immediate future, there's a lot of “overpromising” going on.
Check it out at drjohnson.com and there are a half-dozen downloads from the different authors of the studies. They are not my property nor did I write them.

Auxiliary Treatments for Renal Failure Cases Receiving Fluid Therapy

Who is the consumer of this article? Dr Johnson’s face-to-face customer. If you are reading this outside that valid veterinary-client patient relationship, consider it ‘random’ and for entertainment purposes only.

Auxiliary Treatments For Canines with Renal Failure

When the kidney is failing, there are two “”numbers” that increase, which give a “measurement” of okayness. There are other numbers that matter, too of course.

The BUN is a number that can be “sky high” without portending the end of the dog. There is no “high” that signaled the end of the dog. So I don’t prognosticate based on that number.

The CREATININE is a key number to judge cases by. “IN general” a CREAT over 4.0 after fluid therapy and diagnosing “other reasons” for the kidney disease; portends a poor prognosis.

However, if the dog has Leptospirosis or Kidney infection or is young, or is responding to therapy – IT DOES NOT MATTER what the Creatinine is; because the case is already exceptional and treatments are more likely to work.

Non-traditional modalities like TUMS, Baking Soda, Vitamin C, and a good multivitamin all have benefits for Kidney failure cases. Learn how:

Canine ectropion, dog rolled-out-eyelid

Canine ectropion is a condition that requires attention and appropriate management to prevent potential comorbidities and discomfort in dogs. Recognizing the symptoms early can help prompt veterinary intervention. Treatments range from medical management to surgical correction, depending on the severity of the ectropion. Without treatment, dogs may experience chronic eye problems, discomfort, and a decreased quality of life.


Pretty comprehensive article I wrote, 800 words over at drjohnson.com:

A Gift of Custom Burl Wood Ring from My Customer

I’ve seen these wooden rings before but I doubted their durability and value. Then I saw some close up. In fact, I GOT some from my client, who is one of the best burl wood ring craftsmen out there. He has an Etsy shop and his rings carry a $5 replacement guarantee. So I thought: “I can get behind that” and now, I know exactly what to buy for “difficult” people at Christmas and birthdays. 
Here’s a brief discussion (with pictures) of these rings, how they’re made and HOW THEY ARE SO STRONG. By Doug Wrege, at https://burlrings.etsy.com
Below, the link to the full length article with pictures. 

Random Panting Dogs, Older Dogs Unexplained Panting

Panting 

Good Morning

I'm not sure if I need to be worried…

Last night wasn't as bad as 2 nights ago (photo on sofa)  My older dog was panting pretty heavy.  She's now lying down, and her heavy breathing almost always slows then.  She does well on walks.  All other behavior remains the same.  Loves to eat and beg. Drinks water. Appetite unchanged.  I know air quality has been bad.  She's inside (73 degrees) all day except walk and maybe 30 minutes in yard.  Usually a walk around the perimeter, then sitting on deck enjoying nature.

Thoughts?

There's nothing that would make me worry very much but if the rapid panting at rest is  “really a thing” –  ( So noticeable and so suddenly ) that is disruptive AND unexplainable, I can check her out. 'There are at least three things that cause panting, with pain in the lead, existential angst third, and then “decreased pulmonary compliance” in third. 

Cardiac failure or pneumonia are practically impossible because other symptoms would be present. In spite of that, the franchise vets love an Xray, Holter monitor, bloodwork, echocardiogram, EKG, MRI and transtracheal wash and culture of recovered fluids. $4,000 

Decreased pulmonary compliance is that gradual process where a chest (ribcage) gets more and more stiff. Like a puppy is entirely compressible, and can fit through narrow spaces, an elderly dog has a stiff barrel-chest.  It's “normal” as they get older and older and then causes these bouts of shallow panting where the dog acts like nothing-at-all is wrong. 

Pain, the most common cause of panting, can be pancreatic, back, hips and knees, even bladder or teeth. But normally the owner has extra-signs to support or tip-us-off to those issues. 

“Existential Angst” also known as Sundowners, and Night Pacers, the dogs can be going deaf, and their vision may be closing in, and it causes the dogs to be anxious and even have quick panting bouts (like little anxiety-attacks) and still act “pretty normal” but the owners usually supply that “She seems kinda anxious when these events occur.”